SDG Food Initiative

Dutch SDG roadmap banner

It is widely known that transformation of the agri-food system is crucial to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This point is stressed by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations. The Director General, José Graziano da Silva states: ‘The SDGs are interlinked and interdependent. But SDGs 1 [poverty] and 2 [hunger] are particularly central to achieving the overall agenda. Many of the goals, such as health and education, cannot be achieved without Zero Hunger’. Hans Eenhoorn of Worldconnectors, former vice President of Unilever (Foods) and member of the United Nations Task Force on Hunger puts it as: ‘We cannot accept a world in which one billion wealthy people are getting sick from over-consumption (obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases etc.) whilst simultaneously one billion people are starving from food shortages, rendering so many physically and mentally incapacitated’.

 

Table: an overview of the food related SDG’s.

SDG table
The Dutch government, private sector and civil society have taken many initiatives to work towards making the food sector more sustainable. The Dutch government highlights the need to address methane emissions and obesity in a CBS report  and its efforts for food security and nutrition in a recent report. The private sector has taken dozens of initiatives, as shown in a report (in Dutch) by food business association FNLI. Civil society, organizations such as Hivos and Fairtrade International are working internationally to tackle hunger, poverty and agricultural sustainability, creating a Food Change Lab and Living Wage Benchmarks respectively.

The need for a Dutch SDG Food Roadmap

Whilst ambitions are high we lack a clear policy vision. This includes a roadmap, an overview of initiatives, and a clear monitoring system. The roadmap should give active food sector parties a clear idea of what actions should be taken, when and by whom. An overview of initiatives should show the gaps or successes and prevent complacency. A monitoring system should track progress and stimulate new activity where needed. A fine example of a roadmap for the energy sector for 2030 is Het Nationale Energie Akkoord. Without a policy vision, the Netherlands holds a short-sighted agenda to tackle the global food related SDGs.

The launch of the SDG Food Initiative (SFI)

HAS Hogeschool, True Price, the SDG Charter and Worldconnectors aim to contribute to the development of an SDG 2 (and 12.3) policy vision using their expertise and leverage through the SDG Food Initiative (SFI). At the end of 2016, 40 food sector representatives stressed the need for this initiative at Transform Your World. Now the SFI is being carried forward by discussion between sector representatives on creating the policy vision. There are multiple ways to become involved:

Create a profile and upload your food related initiatives on the SDG Gateway: a ‘go to’ environment where Dutch SDG initiatives can be promoted and discovered.

Join the SDG Charter Event on September 25 for a workshop surrounding the SFI: Tickets here

Support initiatives or seek sector expertise, reach out to Rosalie de Bruijn through rosalie@sdgcharter.nl.

Visit the Worldconnectors’ website to keep track of recent updates of de SDG Food Initiative’s activities.

 

 

 

Rose farming in Kenya

LWROSE blog cover

Although great progress is being made on sustainability in the rose sector in Kenya, worker’s wages need to double or even triple for them to sufficiently provide for themselves and their families, as suggested in the P+magazine article. The results communicated in this article is sourced from a True Price study made in partnership with the NGO Hivos. This article also describes the vulnerability of women workers to gender discrimination and sexual violations, often trust is abused when depending on overtime and other in-kind benefits. A key CSR study cites that sexual harassment and intimidation occurs in half the Kenyan rose farms assessed.

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This infographic gives an impression of an actual wage and the gap to reach a living wage for single and double parent households. True Price’s Living Wage study finds that over half of women working in Kenyan Rose farms are single mothers and are the sole provider for their families.

Read our report on the business case for a living wage in Kenyan rose farming. This was an assignment comissioned by the international NGO Hivos.

Follow us @TruePrice to find out how else we contribute to the case for a Living Wage.

Future of Coffee Depends on Adequate Income for Farmers

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The coffee sector praises sustainability and yet the chances are the coffee you’re drinking came from farmers living below the poverty line with little security in the future of the farms.

True Price undertook the first study of its kind with Fairtrade International; a detailed analysis of coffee farmer income across seven coffee producing countries: Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda, Kenya, India, Indonesia and Vietnam.

True Price examined how much farmers earn from coffee and what positive or negative impact the amount has on the overall household income.  This infographic demonstrates the disparity of total household income per country.

In all cases, coffee farming is not the sole income of a household, often it is necessary to make income from different agri-production or non-farming income. Interestingly, the dependence of coffee farming as income varied greatly between different producing countries. Farmers in Indonesia rely heavily on their income from coffee whilst Kenyan farmers earned the majority of their household income from other good or non-farm income. Indonesian farmers also make the highest profit per/kilo due to high yields, whilst Kenyan coffee farmers make a large loss of profit and so must absorb this my earning money by other means.

Looking at income in this way is a critical step to work towards a fair, sustainable Living Wage for Coffee farmers.

Discover more in  the Fairtrade International Executive Summary

 

True Price Banana report

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In a recent assessment, True Price calculated the true price of bananas and exposed the external costs in their production.

As the most traded fruit on the planet and with a low price tag for consumers, we seem to be well and truly seduced.

What we do not see is the True Price; a price that includes environmental costs like damage from agrochemical farming or rainforest depletion and the social costs of low wages and poverty.

2017-06-02 16_56_41-Externe_kosten_van_bananenproductie.pdf

As seen here, True Price finds that Fair Trade banana production has lower environmental and social costs then the conventional. By supporting Fair Trade as a more sustainable model, we can contribute to reaching the planet’s 2030 SDG.
Have a look at the report published via Fair Trade Max Havelaar. (In Dutch)

The Banana Debate.

Banana debate ENG 3105

Love bananas? Bananas are the world’s most traded fruit, with an export value of $ 10 billion a year. 10 billion! They are an essential source of income for many thousands of families. But how much do these families actually earn? What is the real price of a banana? And how can you calculate this? True Price has researched the true price of bananas on behalf of Fairtrade International. Results are presented at the Rode Hoed bar in Amsterdam, 19:30 Tuesday 30th May.