Rose farming in Kenya

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Although great progress is being made on sustainability in the rose sector in Kenya, worker’s wages need to double or even triple for them to sufficiently provide for themselves and their families, as suggested in the P+magazine article. The results communicated in this article is sourced from a True Price study made in partnership with the NGO Hivos. This article also describes the vulnerability of women workers to gender discrimination and sexual violations, often trust is abused when depending on overtime and other in-kind benefits. A key CSR study cites that sexual harassment and intimidation occurs in half the Kenyan rose farms assessed.

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This infographic gives an impression of an actual wage and the gap to reach a living wage for single and double parent households. True Price’s Living Wage study finds that over half of women working in Kenyan Rose farms are single mothers and are the sole provider for their families.

Read our report on the business case for a living wage in Kenyan rose farming. This was an assignment comissioned by the international NGO Hivos.

Follow us @TruePrice to find out how else we contribute to the case for a Living Wage.