17 September 2019: The True Price of Fashion (De echte prijs van fashion)

The True Price of Fashion

Is a T-Shirt costing € 5,99 too cheap? Or a € 150 pair of jeans too expensive? In the production of fashion there are many hidden costs, such as underpayment of personnel, fossil energy and water consumption, poor working conditions or climate change due to greenhouse gases.

More and more companies, consumers, civil society organisations, and governments want to know and reduce these costs. For example, ABN AMRO and Impact Institute estimated that the true cost of jeans is on average € 33.

At the same time, the prevailing opinion is that we cannot pass the bill on to people with low incomes or farmers at the beginning of the fashion value chain.

A journey through the value chain can give us insight into the societal costs. Should the true price be made transparent so that businesses and consumers can make more sustainable choices? Or should the true price be paid? We will discuss this important issue with experts and the attendees!

There are limited seats available. Register now! The site is in Dutch, the event is in English.

FREE, EXTERNAL REGISTRATION

Tuesday 17 September, 16.00
CIRCL, Amsterdam

Working in partnership with

The True Price of Jeans

What is the true price of a pair of jeans?

On average the true price is 33 euros above the retail price.

Using the true price method, Impact Institute and ABN AMRO‘s report the True Price of Jeans (Dutch version: True Pricing in de jeansketen) is being featured by Dutch national news outlets including NU.nl, de Telegraaf, RTLZ, Trouw, on radio 3 and on TV RTL EditieNL.

How can this gap be closed? The cotton must be produced more efficiently and forced labor must be stopped. At the same time, workers need to earn living wages. Finally, circularity should be improved by reusing the denim from jeans more often.

Interested in learning more? Join us on 4 June for The True Price of Food Event we are hosting in collaboration with Pakhuis de Zwijger and Circl. This event is the first of three that will explore how true pricing can be applied to various sectors. In September, the second event will explore The True Price of Fashion.

At True Price, we want to raise consumers’ awareness of the background of products of good. Typically, the retail price does not consider the external effect the production of goods has on society and environment. For that reason, True Price wants to make things transparent to calculate the real cost – or the true price– of products.

4 juni 2019: De echte prijs van voedsel

De echte prijs van voedsel

Wie betaalt en wat betekent dit voor de voedselindustrie en de consument?

Is een kilo bananen voor 99 cent te goedkoop, of een brood van 3 euro te duur? Bij de productie en consumptie van voedsel zijn er veel verborgen kosten, zoals onderbetaling van personeel, energie- en waterverbruik, slechte arbeidsomstandigheden of klimaatverandering door broeikasgassen uit kunstmest. Steeds meer bedrijven, consumenten, maatschappelijke organisaties en overheden willen dat de vervuiler betaalt. Zo vragen meer dan 100 CEO’s voor een (hogere) prijs op CO2-uitstoot. Tegelijkertijd is de heersende opinie dat we de rekening niet neer kunnen leggen bij mensen met een laag inkomen of boeren aan het begin van de keten. Een reis door het productieproces zorgt voor inzicht in de keten en negatieve gevolgen die vervolgens worden omgezet in financiële cijfers, de true price.

Moet de echte prijs transparant gemaakt worden zodat bedrijf en consument zelf duurzamere keuzes kunnen maken, of moet de echte prijs gelijk worden afgerekend? Met experts gaan we in gesprek over dit belangrijke vraagstuk, de impact op de voedselketen en oplossingen!

GRATIS, EXTERN RESERVEREN

dinsdag 4 juni, 16.00
CIRCL, Amsterdam

In samenwerking met

MET IN DIT PROGRAMMA ONDER ANDEREN

Michel Scholte
Directeur en co-founder True Price & Impact Institute
Willy Baltussen
Onderzoeker Dienst Landbouwkundig Onderzoek, Wageningen University & Research
Jos Huijbregts
Directeur bij Bakker van Vessem

 

Maarten Rijninks
Directeur FairBites en Fairconnect en mede-eigenaar van biologische supermarkt De Aanzet

Sustainability of food

How does sustainability influence our food?

This was the subject of Sustainable Food Event 2018 in Gouda.

On National Sustainability Day Adrian de Groot Ruiz, Co-founder and Director of True Price, introduced the concept of true pricing at the Sustainable Food Event Gouda. This event was inspirational and informative evening that our responsibility to choose sustainable food.

True Price contributed to the evening by sharing concrete examples of how food prices do not reflect the cost our food has on society and the environment.

True Price wants to raise consumers’ awareness of the background of products and goods. Typically, the retail price does not consider the external effect the production of goods has on society and environment. For that reason, True Price wants to make things transparent to calculate the real cost – or the true price– of products.

You can learn more about the true price of products and follow our journey by connecting with us on LinkedIn and Facebook.

Read about the Sustainable Food Event Gouda and the Fairtrade Gemeente Gouda year-round initiatives here (in Dutch).

May the best farmer win!

How does the true price of organic agriculture differ from conventional agriculture?

Adrian de Groot Ruiz gave an interview about organic versus conventional agriculture on Business News Radio (in Dutch). You can listen to the whole interview, in response to a statement of Louise Fresco, the President of Wageningen University and Research. (His part starts at 22 minutes) here.

Read a summary of the questions and answers below:

Interview on BNR Duurzaam

Adrian de Groot Ruiz as an expert on this statement:
“Organic agriculture is less productive than conventional agriculture”

Journalist Frederique Mol is the interviewer.

The real costs are not included in the price consumers pay. Who pays for these?
Society pays. For example, when CO2 emissions go up, there will be more floods. We will need to build more dams and the productivity of agriculture will go down. These are costs which are real, but the person enjoying the piece of chocolate does not pay for it.

Which information do you need to judge the statement?
Environment is the most interesting, because the advantage is that organic agriculture is better per hectare. There is less use of pesticides and herbicides, there is less loss of soil quality and less CO2 emissions per hectare. The disadvantage is there is less produce per hectare.

How do you calculate the real price?
Multiply the costs per hectare with efficiency. With the use of pesticides and herbicides, you determine the loss of species and value the different species. With CO2 you take the societal costs. We calculate 110 euros for a ton of CO2.

Does organic agriculture perform better than conventional agriculture?
The most leading studies show that the yield is about 20 percent lower.

That sounds like bad news for organic agriculture. Can we put a price on it?
No, and that is the interesting part. This is what we should measure, but it differs per continent and per product. To be fair, we don’t know. So it’s important that everyone measures and reports their true price. For example, an organic trader, Eosta, reports their costs per hectare, but we would like to see the costs per product and then: may the best farmer win!